Για να παίρνουμε έξτρα ιδέες....

Σαϊκέι Τοπίο σε Μικρογραφία και ο,τι έχει σχέση.
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Ifikratis
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Για να παίρνουμε έξτρα ιδέες....

Δημοσίευση από Ifikratis » 20 Δεκ 2013, 09:41

[justify]Το έχω διαβάσει ξανά πριν 2 - 3 χρόνια στο φορουμ αλλά είπα να το ξαναανεβάσω και εγω για να το έχουμε μαζεμένα γιατί δεν είχα χρόνο να το ψάξω που το είχα διαβάσει...


Tending to a bonsai tree is a time consuming and painstaking process at the best of time.
But imagine combining that arduous and complex task with building scale models of windmills, lighthouses and even the Michelin Man.
Well imagine no more because one Japanese artist has done just that with these bizarre but fascinating miniature sculptures molded around bonsai trees.

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Treemendous: Artist Takanori Aiba constructs tiny worlds around bonsai trees to create his unique models



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Labour of love: Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin and paint, former maze illustrator Takanori Aiba has constructed a host of sprawling miniature communities that wrap around the tiny trees



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Treemendous: Artist Takanori Aiba constructs tiny worlds around bonsai trees to create his unique models

Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin and paint, former maze illustrator Takanori Aiba has but in huge effort for small results by constructing a host of sprawling miniature communities that wrap around the tiny trees.

More...
Following his work as an illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE he has spent the best part of the last 10 years producing these detailed mini worlds.
On his own website Aiba describes the art form as 'an experimental approach to turn out a modern Bonsai style that portrays the beauty of spiritual accordance between human and nature in miniature'.
He put his mind to creating the three dimensional art works, combining his knowledge and experience of maze illustrating and architecture, which he had also previously trained in.


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Miniature worlds: Aiba describes his unusual art form as 'an experimental approach that portrays the beauty of spiritual accordance between human and nature in miniature'







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Time consuming: The works have taken the artist hours to reconstruct, despite the cultivating of bonsai being an already time consuming effort


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Above par: Aiba creates a golf course around a tree in yet another of his impressive miniature landscape models









The works have taken the artist hours to reconstruct, despite the cultivating of bonsai being an already time consuming effort.
Bonsai trees are primarily tended to for aesthetics and exercise, both physical and mental, and unlike other tending is not intended for production of food or medicines.
Techniques often used include pruning, root reduction, potting, defoliation, and grafting to produce small trees that mimic the shape and style of mature, full-size trees.
When the bonsai nears its final size it is planted in a display pot and its growth is restricted by the pot environment.
Following World War II, a number of trends made the Japanese tradition of bonsai more and more accessible to Western and world audiences.
One key trend was the increase in the number, scope, and prominence of bonsai exhibitions.

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Tyresome: Takanori Aiba has spent hours creating bonsai models like this one that even includes the Michelin Man, mascot for the tyre manufacturers

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Popularity: Following World War II, a number of trends made the Japanese tradition of bonsai more and more accessible to Western and world audiences

Artist cultivates magical microcosmic worlds with miniature bonsai trees[center]Εικόνα[/center][COLOR=#NaNNaNNaN]© Takanori Aiba[/COLOR][/justify][justify]The spiritual and cultural significance of growing miniature bonsai trees derives from a thousand-year-old horticultural tradition in Japan, representing a careful, contemplative and Zen-influenced relationship between humans and nature. Taking up this time-honoured practice of cultivating trees, Japanese artist-architect Takanori Aiba gives his bonsai an unusual twist by adding on miniature, realistic structures like bridges, stairs and intricately detailed buildings.
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© Takanori Aiba
Drawing upon his work experience as a maze illustrator and architect, Aiba uses stone clay, epoxy putty, copper line, plastic, resin and various recycled items to create imaginary landscapes around his small trees. He explains on My Modern Met that
[BLOCKQUOTE]Bonsai reflects the Japanese traditional aesthetic sense of expressing the magnificence of nature in a small potted plant. However, the density of decoration and the rich stories of my works contain extraordinary times and spaces which differ from the bonsai world determined by plants physiology.[/BLOCKQUOTE][/justify]
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© Takanori Aiba
Though his sculptures of tiny treehouses, solitary lighthouses and the Michelin Hotel (literally) may seem unorthodox and relatively overbuilt, bonsai-wise, there are more traditionalist elements than meets the eye. Aiba also employssuiseki -- naturally occurring small rocks that would appeal to rock collectors, and which are traditionally placed on containers of their own.
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© Takanori Aiba
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© Takanori Aiba
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© Takanori Aiba
Then there is this whimsical "Ice Cream Packages" piece, which we suppose is constructed with recycled ice cream packaging.
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© Takanori Aiba
Blending tradition with a vibrant, fantastical realism, Aiba's unconventional sculptures point to new horizons in a venerable tradition, by allowing us to peer into an idyllic world where nature and man live harmoniously, side by side. More over at Takanori Aiba's website.


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(Image credit: Takanori Aiba)
By Mariella Moon, Tecca
If you think all bonsai look like mini trees in somebody's zen garden, you haven't seen Takanori Aiba's pieces yet. The Japanese artist combines bonsai art form with Lilliputian architecture design to create some of the most stunning pieces you will ever see.


On his website, Aiba says his crossover creations are the fruit of his days as a (plain) bonsai maker and maze illustrator. None of his designs are derived from real structures — all of them are products of his imagination. But because the details are so elaborate, people usually think he copies the designs of real buildings.
So just how much time does he take to create one of these exactly? Aiba tells Tecca that each piece is so detailed, it takes him anywhere from three months to a year and a half. The bonsai in the first image below took him six months to finish, while the one in the second picture called Hawaiian Pineapple Resort took him a full year.
Unfortunately, you have to go to Japan if you want to see these artworks in person. Aiba is looking for more opportunities to exhibit his work, though one of his pieces called Hotel de Michelin is currently displayed in his restaurant in Tokyo.
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(Image credit: Takanori Aiba)
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(Image credit: Takanori Aiba)




http://www.tokyogoodidea.com/

Η ημιμάθεια χείρων εστί και αυτής ταύτης της αμαθείας

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marios
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Re: Για να παίρνουμε έξτρα ιδέες....

Δημοσίευση από marios » 20 Δεκ 2013, 09:49

Σωστός o Ifikratis!!!

Bonsai Tree Houses by Takanori Aiba
February 14, 2012

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For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here. (via design you trust)

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iohokahey
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Re: Για να παίρνουμε έξτρα ιδέες....

Δημοσίευση από iohokahey » 20 Δεκ 2013, 10:15

με μια μεταφρασουλα θα ηταν οτι πρεπει..!
..When The Night Is Overcome
You May Rise To Find The Sun..

Γιώργος

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karesansui
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Re: Για να παίρνουμε έξτρα ιδέες....

Δημοσίευση από karesansui » 20 Δεκ 2013, 13:19

Τον έχουμε παρουσιάσει τον καλλιτέχνη στο φόρουμ παλιότερα!
Μόνο που αυτές οι κατασκευές ή συνθέσεις δεν είναι σαϊκέι με κανένα τρόπο!
Πιό πολύ για avantgard πέντζινκ μοιάζουν!

ΥΓ κάνε ένα κόπο τώρα και παράθεσε την μετάφραση στα ελληνικά αν τολμάς Εικόνα
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"To see a world in a grain of sand And a heaven in a wild flower, Hold infinity in the palm of your hand, And eternity in an hour" W.Blake

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filitsa
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Re: Για να παίρνουμε έξτρα ιδέες....

Δημοσίευση από filitsa » 20 Δεκ 2013, 14:55

Πολύ όμορφες κατασκευές.

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RiaDr
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Re: Για να παίρνουμε έξτρα ιδέες....

Δημοσίευση από RiaDr » 21 Δεκ 2013, 10:34

Σ' ευχαριστούμε ξανά, λοιπόν!

υγ παράκληση: να μην ανεβάζετε ξενόγλωσσα άρθρα χωρίς μετάφραση. ευχαριστώ.
"Το καλύτερο λίπασμα για τα φυτά είναι η σκιά του κηπουρού.."

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